Nepal strives to get tourism back on track

with tourism in Nepal having taken a body blow in the wake of the devastating earthquake in April, the country is making efforts to revive the footfalls for the “high season” starting late September through promotions and ease of travel advisories by foreign countries.

Kathmandu-durbar-square

A Nepal Tourism Board (NTB) official said that there has been only a trickle of tourists from India in May and June – the months that see large numbers visiting the Himalayan nation due to school vacations in India. About a fourth of foreign tourists in Nepal come from India.

“We have lost the regular Indian season for May and June. However, we look forward to welcoming Indian tourists during the Dussehra holidays (in October),” NTB senior manager Ujjwala Dali said.

She said a “plan for tourism recovery” has been prepared by the Pacific Asia Travel Association (PATA) and the NTB would start promotional activities to get arrivals from countries such as Britain, the US, Japan and Australia, apart from the European Union, for the high season.

“We hope to get Nepal back on the tourism map when the tourism high season begins,” Dali said.

She said that trekking tracks are opened in September and October and weather conditions are also considered pleasant by the visitors through September-November and February-April.

“In December and January there are holidays in many parts of the world and tourists come here,” she said.

Tourism is Nepal’s second-highest foreign exchange earner and is estimated to contribute about 12 percent to the country’s GDP through direct and indirect employment.

People associated with Nepal’s tourism industry said that some key heritage sites and trekking routes had been damaged in the powerful earthquake on April 25 but there still was a lot for tourists to see and savour across the country.

“Some of the media reports about damage to infrastructure were exaggerated. The epicentre of earthquake was not Kathmandu. If you go across the city, you will see that most of the new buildings do not appear to have suffered real damage. Nepal is back and we are on our feet,” Amir K. Pradhananga, resident manager at Grand Hotel here, said.

“Life is normal (now),” he added.

Over 8,500 people were killed in Nepal due to the powerful earthquake in April and another strong quake in May. As for the repeated aftershocks, Pradhananga said the locals were taking these in their stride and there was no panic.

NTB Administrative Officer Ramesh Kumar Adhikari said the projections were that Nepal will get 40 percent fewer tourists this year and 20 percent in 2016.

“We want that the numbers of visitors to be as close to last year as is possible and we are taking several measures in that direction, including promotions,” Adhikari said.

Officials said about 60 percent of those who visit Nepal come for sight-seeing and cultural tourism while about 40 percent come for adventure-related activities. The pattern was unlikely to change after the earthquake.

Dali said that Nepal was urging foreign countries to ease their travel advisories issued after the April earthquake. She said Nepalese missions abroad were also issuing updated information.

“We will also focus more on the travel trade fairs in the coming months. There are already familiarisation visits by the media and tour operators,” she said.

She said that there were many places for tourists to visit Nepal including the “golden triangle of Pokhara, Chitwan and Kathmandu“.

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Source: thestatesman.com

Nepal is ready to welcome tourists

On 25th April 2015 an earthquake struck the central region of Nepal in the Gorkha district just north of the main highway between Kathmandu and Pokhara.  The earthquake was followed by a number of severe aftershocks  and as a result, there were more than 8000 people found dead,  thousands more injured and it destroyed houses, trekking trails and monuments including centuries-old palaces and temples listed as UNESCO World Heritage Sites.

Maha-Shivaratri-pashupatinath

Despite damage to some of its historical and cultural monuments and trekking trails, Nepal is  now ready to welcome tourists. Some of the monuments in the  heritage sites will be reopen for tourists from June 15, 2015. Roads and air transport links remain intact across the country; the majority of hotels and restaurants are in operation.  Most trekking areas except Manaslu and Langtang have  not been damaged by the Earthquake and trekking can be undertaken any time in these areas.  Chitwan, Pokhara, Annapurna region and Bardia also escaped widespread damage, and are thus ready to showcase their abundance of natural life.  The birthplace of the Buddha, Lumbini, did not suffer damage and is thankfully all set to welcome visitors back to its sacred soil.

There are many beautiful and captivating cultural and natural sites in the West, Mid-West, Far West and East Nepal  that await tourists to welcome there.  Out of 75 districts of Nepal, only 14 districts are damaged. Apart from Langtang, Manaslu and Gaurishankar,  other  14 national parks and conservation areas including Everest, Annapurna, Kanchanjunga areas withsood the earthquake with strength and power.

The Government of Nepal request international travelers to visit the magnificent and bustling country of Nepal, and support her by visiting it as she attempts to stand proudly on her feet once again. Walk the beautiful trails in the shadow of the most magnificent mountains on earth as you help the Nepalese people reset their course on the path to prosperity.  Nepal is now embarking upon the most fascinating period in all of its ancient history, and you could be right there to see it happen and your contribution will be a part of rebuilding new Nepal.

Tourism is one of the mainstays of the Nepalese economy, and Nepal will certainly need the income that tourism brings in as it attempts to recover from this disaster.

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Nepal Safe Destination for Travel

A recurring question, perhaps fueled by poor journalism or by out-of-date advice from Governments,  is ‘Is it safe to travel in Nepal ?

The short answer is yes, it is very safe in fact. Nepal feels more safe than most other countries around the globe, possibly due to the the religious nature of the people and their natural kindness. When Nepal shook under the impact of a 7.8 magnitude earthquake on April 25 followed up by a scourge of a series of powerful aftershocks, the country’s tourism industry was struck with a jolt of an equal magnitude.

Chitwan National Park

“We have found more than 90 percent of hotels that we monitored safe to accommodate tourists,” Kosh Nath Adhikari, senior divisional engineer of DoT, said. “Of the eight five-star hotels in Kathmandu, six have received green stickers while New Baneshwar-based The Everest Hotel has received red sticker. We are yet to assess the buildings of Hotel Yak & Yeti. “The five-star hotels, which have been declared fit to accommodate guests, are Radisson Hotel Kathmandu, Hotel Shangri La, The Malla Hotel, Hotel Annapurna, Hyatt Regency Kathmandu and Soaltee Crowne Plaza.We must be able to tell them that yes we have suffered collapsed structures, but still we have many places where you can visit,” Baral said. Pointing out that Lumbini and Pokhara remained intact,

Baral emphasized the only two trekking routes in Manaslu and Langtang areas suffered the impact of natural calamity, but many other trek routes are safe. “It has been hard,” said Sujan Sijapati, operations manager for Intrepid Travel in Nepal. “The earthquake meant that the season finished early and we’ve already written off the coming month to focus on rebuilding for the coming season.”

Tourism is critical to Nepal’s economy. The World Travel and Tourism Council reports that the industry contributed 8.9% to Nepal’s gross domestic product in 2014, supporting 1.1 million jobs. Before the earthquake, Nepal was the 26th fastest-growing tourism economy out of 188 countries. Most importantly, in the long term, it is essential that people travel to Nepal again in the future and contribute to its recovery by spending generously.

I recently spoke to .Dipendra Adhikari Tourism Entrepreneur and he said this season has ended early .He added we shouldn’t loose hope and we should be prepared for the Autumn season. For decades, tourism has been one of the pillar industries of Nepal and the main source of its foreign exchange reserve. No Doubt ,After things return to normal, Nepal should make more efforts to attract more tourists, who have become one of the largest groups of globetrotters and spenders in recent years.

After All Tourism is for All and It is a most promoting Industry ,we should not let this industry with a way ,Always need the unified vision and Action to establish this industry forever.

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Source: www.ajeybharat.com

Get on a holiday to Nepal! Tourism is the most sustainable way to help

  • ANNAPURNA BASE CAMP TREK - 15 DAYS
    ANNAPURNA BASE CAMP TREK - 15 DAYS
    This trek is the one of best views of annapurna range, nilgiri , Dhaulagiri , Tukuche peak , Dhampus peak , Hiunchuli ,Machhapuchhre , Gangapurna, Lamjung Himal other many more greatest views of mountains you never seen before.
  • KATHMANDU-POKHARA-CHITWAN TOUR (BY FLY/LAND)- 07 NIGHTS 08 DAYS
    KATHMANDU-POKHARA-CHITWAN TOUR (BY FLY/LAND)- 07 NIGHTS 08 DAYS
    Nepal, the land of splendid nature and rich culture is waiting for you exploration through its different facets.
  • DAMODAR KUND TOUR BY HELICOPTER - 05 NIGHTS 06 DAYS
    DAMODAR KUND TOUR BY HELICOPTER - 05 NIGHTS 06 DAYS
    Many Hindus from round the globe are dreaming to take a holy bath at least once in their life time in the sacred Damodar-Kund
  • 08 DAYS 07 NIGHTS NEPAL TRIP:  KATHMANDU 3N, CHITWAN 2N, POKHARA 2N
    08 DAYS 07 NIGHTS NEPAL TRIP: KATHMANDU 3N, CHITWAN 2N, POKHARA 2N
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  • EVEREST BASE CAMP TREK - 17 DAYS
    EVEREST BASE CAMP TREK - 17 DAYS
    Sagamartha (Everest) Base Camp trek takes us into one of the most spectacular regions of Nepal where the Sherpa culture thrives amongst the highest peaks in the world.
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    KAILASH MANSAROVAR YATRA BY OVERLAND - 14 DAYS
    Mt. Kailash (6714m) is the most sacred mountain in Asia.
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    KAILASH YATRA BY HELICOPTER VIA NEPALGUNJ/SIMIKOT/HILSA/TAKLAKOT - 11 DAYS
    Mt. Kailash, the sacred mountain and the abode of the Hindu god Shiva is one of the world's greatest pilgrimage destinations especially for Hindus, Buddhist, Jains and others.
  • MUKTINATH TOUR BY LAND/FLIGHT
    MUKTINATH TOUR BY LAND/FLIGHT
    Muktinath is one of the most ancient Hindu temples of God Vishnu.

Nepal needs tourists – what is open and what is closed for travel and tourism?

eTN is planning a series of reports in cooperation with an inside view by leaders in the travel and tourism industry in Nepal.

Pankaj Pradhananaga is the eTN Ambassador in Nepal and also the Director of Four Seasons Travel in Kathmandu. He is one of several recognized leaders in the travel and tourism industry. He represents the eTN-supported International Coalition of Tourism Partners (ICTP) in Nepal and has been driving to bring local tourism leaders together.

Pankaj’s message to the world: Invite desperately-needed visitors to come back to this country. Tourism is the most sustainable way to help Nepal. Plan your holiday in Nepal in the near future.

He asks: “What is next? How long will it take to bring the tourism industry back on track?”

This is aked by entrepreneurs, tourism professionals, and many more who survived the devastating earthquake of April 25.

Needless to say, Nepal was not prepared to handle such a devastating quake that killed more than 8,000 people and many more thousands got injured. The initial bottleneck was visible in terms of coordinating rescue and relief operations. International media left no stone unturned to paint the gloomy picture of the devastating sites in Kathmandu valley and the remote villages.

Truth be told, in Kathmandu valley, there have been damages to some monuments, a few collapsing completely, but the majority of structures in Patan and Bhaktapur have withstood the earthquake. The monuments in Bhaktapur durbar square are standing tall except the temple of Wutshala. The UNESCO sites of Pashupatinath temple & Boudhanath stupa are unaffected.

Unfortunately Kathmandu Durbar Square is affected the most. The residential buildings in the old part of the cities have been affected, too, especially in Bhaktapur. However, all have not.

The work has already begun to clear the debris of collapsed buildings in the valley.

Thankfully other major tourist destinations like Pokhara, Chitwan, Bandipur, and Lumbini are unaffected by the earthquake.

Many major hotels in Kathmandu are back in business. Mr. Pradhyumna Ghimire, Director of Sales, Hotel Soaltee Crowne Plaza, confirmed that his hotel is fully operational. Some other hotels in the valley temporarily stopped operations to get a structural assessment and repair work done.

The mid-hill of central Nepal has been hit badly with villages and small towns suffering collapse or damage. Relief work is now shifting to these areas and away from the city where things are slowly getting back to normal.

The trekking routes in Annapurna and Everest regions are all okay and operational. As per Mr. Bikram Neupane, National Coordinator of Himalayan Rescue Association (HRA), one can enjoy trekking holidays in these areas.

It doesn’t count for the Langtang region. This part of Nepal was the worst affected, and it will take a minimum of 6 months for treks to operate there.

Needless to say, Nepal’s tourism industry has witnessed unprecedented cancellations posing a great threat to employment and the overall economy of this mountain-locked country.

While there is no rush for people to immediately visit Nepal, there is no reason to discourage visitors either, especially for those wanting to visit in a month or two.

It is highly commendable that friends of Nepal all over the world are helping the country with relief drives. However, the most sustainable way to help Nepal is to go there on a holiday.

Source: www.eturbonews.com

9 Amazing Experiences in Nepal

  • ANNAPURNA BASE CAMP TREK - 15 DAYS
    ANNAPURNA BASE CAMP TREK - 15 DAYS
    This trek is the one of best views of annapurna range, nilgiri , Dhaulagiri , Tukuche peak , Dhampus peak , Hiunchuli ,Machhapuchhre , Gangapurna, Lamjung Himal other many more greatest views of mountains you never seen before.
  • KATHMANDU-POKHARA-CHITWAN TOUR (BY FLY/LAND)- 07 NIGHTS 08 DAYS
    KATHMANDU-POKHARA-CHITWAN TOUR (BY FLY/LAND)- 07 NIGHTS 08 DAYS
    Nepal, the land of splendid nature and rich culture is waiting for you exploration through its different facets.
  • DAMODAR KUND TOUR BY HELICOPTER - 05 NIGHTS 06 DAYS
    DAMODAR KUND TOUR BY HELICOPTER - 05 NIGHTS 06 DAYS
    Many Hindus from round the globe are dreaming to take a holy bath at least once in their life time in the sacred Damodar-Kund
  • 08 DAYS 07 NIGHTS NEPAL TRIP:  KATHMANDU 3N, CHITWAN 2N, POKHARA 2N
    08 DAYS 07 NIGHTS NEPAL TRIP: KATHMANDU 3N, CHITWAN 2N, POKHARA 2N
    Nepal, the land of splendid nature and rich culture is waiting for you exploration through its different facets.
  • EVEREST BASE CAMP TREK - 17 DAYS
    EVEREST BASE CAMP TREK - 17 DAYS
    Sagamartha (Everest) Base Camp trek takes us into one of the most spectacular regions of Nepal where the Sherpa culture thrives amongst the highest peaks in the world.
  • KAILASH MANSAROVAR YATRA BY OVERLAND - 14 DAYS
    KAILASH MANSAROVAR YATRA BY OVERLAND - 14 DAYS
    Mt. Kailash (6714m) is the most sacred mountain in Asia.
  • KAILASH YATRA BY HELICOPTER VIA NEPALGUNJ/SIMIKOT/HILSA/TAKLAKOT - 11 DAYS
    KAILASH YATRA BY HELICOPTER VIA NEPALGUNJ/SIMIKOT/HILSA/TAKLAKOT - 11 DAYS
    Mt. Kailash, the sacred mountain and the abode of the Hindu god Shiva is one of the world's greatest pilgrimage destinations especially for Hindus, Buddhist, Jains and others.
  • MUKTINATH TOUR BY LAND/FLIGHT
    MUKTINATH TOUR BY LAND/FLIGHT
    Muktinath is one of the most ancient Hindu temples of God Vishnu.

You’ve dreamed of climbing Mount Everest. Many of us have, and when you think about Nepal, you usually lump the world’s tallest peak in with your thoughts. The thing is, unless you have a nice chunk of change (I’m talking about a hundred grand here) and a ton of patience (the lines to the summit are a travesty these days), you probably aren’t going to climb Sagarmatha, as the Nepalese call her, but that’s okay. There are plenty of things to do that are amazing (and safer) in this tiny Southeast Asia country just north of India, and we’re going to experience nine of them right now!

  1. Check Out Everest Anyway: One of the most amazing experiences you can have while visiting Nepal is, of course, to see the mountain in all of its splendor and glory. A less stressful, albeit still high-endurance, workout is an Everest first-base-camp trek, which, naturally, takes you to the mountain’s first base camp. Sound too strenuous? Go up to the peak via plane and be blown away by the fact that she is still taller than you are, even in the air!
  2. Tigers, and Tigers, and Tigers, Oh My!: If you’ve ever wanted to see Bengal tigers roaming naturally in their habitat, then you must visit Chitwan National Park. This UNESCO World Heritage National Park is truly one of the most amazing places in Southeast Asia. Resting at the base of the Himalayan Mountains, you’ll have breathtaking views of nature and the world’s grandest big cats as they romp and roam.
  3. Absorb Local Culture in Kathmandu: The Nepalese capital and largest city is Kathmandu (that’s “cat-man-doo”), and it’s really something to see. I love the energy of this city, not to mention the color and culture! There are tons of markets and bazaars in the center of the city, as well as the Royal Palace, which was built in the 14th century for, of course, the king of the country. Of particular note, however, is…
  4. Kathmandu’s Durbar Square: This ancient square is at the heart of Kathmandu and is where you’ll find the Royal Palace alongside many other notable structures. This area is so notable, in fact, that UNESCO has given it World Heritage status. There are several temples dedicated to various gods and goddesses and the Durbar Square Museum that explains it all in fascinating fashion. Trust me; you’ve never seen a square like this one!
  5. Take a Load Off in the Garden of Dreams: After you’ve hoofed it to Everest’s base camp and wandered through the glorious craziness that is Kathmandu, head over the city’s Garden of Dreams for a relaxing oasis. Inspired by the Europeans, this garden is filled with cafes and restaurants for a quick bite among the many fountains and ponds designed to calm and relax you.
  6. Party Like it’s the Festival of Holi: You’ve refreshed yourself in the Garden of Dreams, so now it’s time to do one of my favorite things in this country, and that is celebrate the Holi Festival. This Hindu celebration takes place toward the end of February or beginning of March, and the entire country goes crazy for a week dousing each other in one gigantic paint and water balloon fight… I’m not kidding! It’s AWESOME!
  7. Visit an Important Birthplace: It’s time to show reverence to another faith, and that is Buddhism. You’re in Nepal, near India, and in the Southeast Asia region where Buddhism is an extremely important part of the culture. Why not visit the birthplace of Buddha to see how it all got started? Head over to Lumbini Gardens, where Buddha was born in 623 B.C., and take in the amazing pillars and temples.
  8. Don’t Stop There: But wait! There’s more! Bhaktapur is one of the best-preserved medieval cities in the country and has the architecture to prove it. Whether in person or via pictures, you’ve seen plenty of European medieval castles and churches, and now, it’s time to see how the Asians did medieval in the many amazing temples you’ll find in the city’s three squares. The shrines alone will blow you away; I know they impressed me!
  9. Get Back to Nature: You’ll discover that nature is a primary theme in this Southeast Asia country, and one of the best places to get back to it after visiting all of the temples in Bhaktapur is going to Pokhara. This little village is only 15 minutes from Kathmandu and is the home of Phewa Lake, some snow-capped peaks, and… well… monkey forests. Yep! These little critters run wild in Pokhara and are quite entertaining in and of them.

Aside from seeing the tallest peak in the world (planes fly LOWER than she is), there are some incredible sights, sounds, and experiences in this little gem north of India. What you’re going to find in Nepal is a part of the world unlike any other, filled with wonderfully friendly people living within a unique culture. Keep in mind that this is a less-developed nation, so you’ll want to take some health and safety precautions. This should not stop you, however, from visiting this amazing, amazing country! Trust me, once you’ve crossed these nine amazing things off of your list, you won’t regret not attempting an Everest summit!

Source: Venera Travel Blog

Chitwan Elephant fest slated to start Dec 26

The 11th edition of the Chitwan Elephant Festival is scheduled to be held in Sauraha from December 26-30 on the occasion of Christmas and New Year 2015.

Chitwan-elephant-festival

The festival is aimed at promoting tourism and spreading awareness about wildlife preservation, said Suman Ghimire, coordinator of the event. It started in 2004 as an international elephant race and since then it has been celebrated as a festival.

The organizer said that a picnic would also be organized for the elephants this year. “Wildlife is our asset and it should be preserved well,” said Ghimire. Another objective of the festival is to encourage tourists to remain in Nepal through the Christmas and the New Year holidays as most of them return to their own countries for the celebrations. The holiday season is also a lean period for Nepal tourism as arrivals start dropping from mid-December. “The festival is targeted at increasing tourist numbers,” said Gyanendra Kumar Bista, president of Regional Hotel Association Nepal in Chitwan. “Such events will also help create awareness to preserve wildlife.”

Hotels and restaurants offer discounts and serve distinct varieties of foods for visitors. Local hotels and restaurants are normally packed with domestic and international tourists during this time. Around 20 elephants compete in a 150-metre race. Likewise, elephant calves play football while an elephant beauty competition is also held which has become one of the major attractions at the tourist hotspot. The event has been successful in promoting tourism in past years. “This is why we have been continuing the festival,” said Deepak Bhattarai, second vice-president of the association. Apart from foreign visitors, the festival has been attracting huge numbers of domestic visitors. Sauraha has more than 100 hotels and all of them are packed during the festival. The jungle safari destination of Sauraha has not only seen an aggressive development of hotels and resorts over the past few years, entrepreneurs have also been making large investments in elephants to carry tourists on sightseeing tours in the jungle.

Chitwan -safari-nepal_966x543

Around Rs 330 million has been spent on rearing elephants. The jumbos have become an integral part of tour packages of the hotels and resorts here.

Situated in the lush tropical plains of southern Nepal, Sauraha attracts safari goers with its rich wildlife and thick jungles. There are 51 elephants owned by hoteliers and cooperatives in Sauraha .

Source: Ekantipur